Snowfall report – Denver Snow http://denversnow.co/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 09:12:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://denversnow.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-26-120x120.png Snowfall report – Denver Snow http://denversnow.co/ 32 32 Spotted lanternfly in all 21 counties of NJ, no need to report anymore https://denversnow.co/spotted-lanternfly-in-all-21-counties-of-nj-no-need-to-report-anymore/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 20:27:51 +0000 https://denversnow.co/spotted-lanternfly-in-all-21-counties-of-nj-no-need-to-report-anymore/ Cape May had been the last hurdle, but on Thursday the New Jersey Department of Agriculture said populations of spotted lanternflies were now found in all 21 counties of the Garden State. A report from NJ.com, citing a department spokesperson, appears to confirm that infestations have spread to Cape May County over the past month. […]]]>

Cape May had been the last hurdle, but on Thursday the New Jersey Department of Agriculture said populations of spotted lanternflies were now found in all 21 counties of the Garden State.

A report from NJ.com, citing a department spokesperson, appears to confirm that infestations have spread to Cape May County over the past month.

An email message from New Jersey 101.5 to the Department of Agriculture requesting independent confirmation was not immediately returned Thursday.

The spokesperson further told NJ.com that residents are no longer being asked to report sightings of the invasive insect, saying the decision was made within the past week.

However, this report page was still active on Thursday.

“While we appreciate the public’s diligence in reporting sightings of spotted lanternflies, it is no longer necessary to report them to us,” the spokesperson told NJ.com.

New Jersey residents are always urged to crush these insects when and where they are seen — and not to trap them with glue or tape.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: The most extreme temperatures in every state’s history

Stacker looked to 2021 data from NOAA’s State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures on record for each state. Each slide also reveals the highest-ever 24-hour rainfall record and highest-ever 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to discover individual state records in alphabetical order.

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used Alex Wellerstein’s NUKEMAP to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

Models show what would happen during an air detonation, meaning the bomb would be detonated into the sky, causing extensive damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a detonation on the ground, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from the fallout.

Beautiful Sunflower Fields to Visit in New Jersey 2022

Among the reasons why the “Garden State” remains an apt nickname for New Jersey – the end of summer means the arrival of sunflower season.

There are at least six domains, spanning the state. Some are in bloom as early as early August, while others should peak from late August to late September.

It is always advisable to call or email before you go if the weather seems to be an issue.

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NYC Toll Plan Report Released; public hearings in two weeks https://denversnow.co/nyc-toll-plan-report-released-public-hearings-in-two-weeks/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 20:25:06 +0000 https://denversnow.co/nyc-toll-plan-report-released-public-hearings-in-two-weeks/ TRENTON — An environmental assessment of the proposed congestion pricing plan to charge tolls to drivers in Manhattan’s central business district finds it would achieve its goals – reducing traffic and raising a lot of money to spend on improvements public transport. The study modeled seven different scenarios for charging tolls south of 60th Street […]]]>

TRENTON — An environmental assessment of the proposed congestion pricing plan to charge tolls to drivers in Manhattan’s central business district finds it would achieve its goals – reducing traffic and raising a lot of money to spend on improvements public transport.

The study modeled seven different scenarios for charging tolls south of 60th Street in Manhattan, each with different combinations of exemptions and discounts. One possibility is that drivers with E-ZPass entering from New Jersey through the Holland or Lincoln tunnels, and possibly even the George Washington Bridge, could get a credit reducing the Manhattan toll.

He finds that traffic in this part of New York would drop 15% to 20%, depending on the toll structure, transit ridership would increase 1% to 2%, and air quality would improve.

Click here to read the report.

Janno Lieber, chairman and chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, said the report “highlights the widespread benefits” of the toll plan.

“Bottom line: Congestion pricing is good for the environment, good for public transit, and good for New York and the region,” Lieber said.

MTA is releasing the environmental assessment of the Central Business Tolling District program in a package presented to media representatives at 2 Broadway. (Marc A. Hermann/MTA)

MTA is releasing the environmental assessment of the Central Business Tolling District program in a package presented to media representatives at 2 Broadway.
(Marc A. Hermann/MTA)

Gov. Phil Murphy said he wouldn’t support the plan if New Jersey drivers were charged twice – once for crossing the Hudson River and another time for entering the central business district. Although New Jersey does not have a vote on MTA shares, it can interfere with the plan by tying up the action through the Port Authority.

Tolls can range from $9 to $12 at peak times for plans with the least crossing credits or $14 to $23 for plans with the most offsets. The more people who are exempt from tolls, the higher the resulting toll in order for the MTA to generate the revenue it seeks for its transit system.

There will be a series of online hearings during the last week of August to get public input. Click here to register or watch the livestream.

Meetings are August 25 at 5 p.m., August 27 at 10 a.m., August 28 at 1 p.m., August 29 at 1 p.m., August 30 at 5 p.m. and August 31 at 10 a.m. Each meeting is scheduled to last three hours.

People can also submit comments online or by email to CBDTP@mtabt.org, voicemail at 646-252-7440, fax at 212-504-3148 to the attention of the CBDTP team or mail to CBD Tolling Program, 2 Broadway, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10004.

All roads south of 60th Street are not included in the central business district. It excludes FDR Drive, the West Side Highway, the Battery Park Underpass, and the road portion of the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel that connects to West Street.

The assessment found that 3% of business trips to the central business district are now made by car from New Jersey. Eighty-five percent is done by public transit, 5% by car from New York, 3% by car from suburban New York counties, 0.2% by car from Connecticut, and 4% by d other means, such as taxis and bicycles.

Michael Symons is the Statehouse Bureau Chief for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at michael.symons@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about a comment or correction for this story.

WATCH: The most extreme temperatures in every state’s history

Stacker looked to 2021 data from NOAA’s State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures on record for each state. Each slide also reveals the highest 24-hour rainfall record of all time and the highest 24-hour snowfall of all time.

Keep reading to discover individual state records in alphabetical order.

8 sharks you might find off the coast of New Jersey

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Amid European heatwave, glaciers are melting at record pace in Alps: report https://denversnow.co/amid-european-heatwave-glaciers-are-melting-at-record-pace-in-alps-report/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 08:06:01 +0000 https://denversnow.co/amid-european-heatwave-glaciers-are-melting-at-record-pace-in-alps-report/ From the way 45-year-old Swiss glaciologist Andreas Linsbauer leaps across icy crevasses, you would never guess he was carrying 10kg of steel equipment needed to track the decline of Swiss glaciers. Normally, he takes this path on the huge Morteratsch glacier at the end of September, at the end of the summer melting season in […]]]>

From the way 45-year-old Swiss glaciologist Andreas Linsbauer leaps across icy crevasses, you would never guess he was carrying 10kg of steel equipment needed to track the decline of Swiss glaciers.

Normally, he takes this path on the huge Morteratsch glacier at the end of September, at the end of the summer melting season in the Alps. But unusually high ice loss this year brought it to the 15-square-kilometre (5.8-square-mile) ice amphitheater two months early for emergency maintenance work.

The measuring poles he uses to track changes in pack depth are at risk of dislodging entirely as the ice melts and he has to drill new holes.

Glaciers in the Alps are on track for their highest mass losses in at least 60 years of record keeping, data shared exclusively with Reuters broadcasts. By looking at the difference between the amount of snow that fell in winter and the amount of ice that melted in summer, scientists can gauge how much a glacier has shrunk in a given year.

Since last winter, which brought relatively little snow, the Alps have gone through two major heat waves at the start of summer – including one in July marked by temperatures near 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit) in the Swiss mountain village of Zermatt.

During this heat wave, the altitude at which the water froze was measured at a record high of 5,184 meters (17,000 feet) – higher than Mont Blanc – compared to the summer level. normal between 3,000 and 3,500 meters (9,800 to 11,500 ft). ).

“It’s really obvious this is an extreme season,” Linsbauer said, shouting over the roar of meltwater as he checked the height of a pole sticking out of the ice.

MOUNTAIN MERGER

Most of the world’s mountain glaciers – remnants of the last Ice Age – are retreating due to climate change. But those in the European Alps are particularly vulnerable because they are smaller with relatively little ice cover. Meanwhile, temperatures in the Alps are warming at around 0.3°C per decade, about twice as fast as the global average.

If greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, glaciers in the Alps are expected to lose more than 80% of their current mass by 2100. Many will disappear, regardless of emissions measures taken now, thanks to global warming fueled by past emissions, according to a 2019 report https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/chapter/chapter-2 by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Already, Morteratsch is very different from the glacier represented on the tourist maps of the region. The long tongue that once reached deep into the valley below has shrunk by nearly 3 kilometers (2 miles), while the depth of snow and sea ice has thinned to 200 meters (656 feet). A parallel Pers glacier flowed there until 2017 but has now retreated so much that an expanding sandstrip lies between them.

This year’s dire situation has raised fears that glaciers in the Alps will disappear sooner than expected. With more years like 2022, that could happen, said Matthias Huss, who leads Glacier Monitoring Switzerland.

“We see that the model results expected decades from now are happening now,” Huss said. “I didn’t expect to see such an extreme year so early in the century.”

NO SNOW, HIGH HEAT

Reuters spoke to glaciologists in Austria, France and Italy who confirmed the glaciers were on track for record losses. In Austria, “glaciers are devoid of snow up to the summits,” said Andrea Fischer, a glaciologist at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Seasonal snowfall, in addition to replenishing ice lost during the summer, protects glaciers from further melting by providing a white blanket that reflects sunlight back into the atmosphere better than darker ice – stained by dust or pollution – can’t do it.

But on the Grand Etret glacier in northwestern Italy, just 1.3 meters (4.2 feet) of snow had accumulated over the past winter, or 2 meters (6.6 feet) less than the annual average for the 20 years to 2020.

This year’s alpine ice losses, recorded even before the biggest melt in August, surprised scientists to some degree, as many glaciers had already lost their lower snouts. Because they had retreated to the mountains, where the temperatures are cooler, scientists thought they should have been better protected.

Read also | Why open data is essential for environmental action

“You can easily imagine that the end results after the summer will be…a significant loss of ice cover in the Italian Alps,” said Marco Giardino, vice president of the Italian Glaciological Committee.

Data shared exclusively with Reuters shows that Morteratsch is now losing about 5 centimeters (2 inches) a day and is already in worse condition than he normally would be at the end of an average summer, according to data from GLAMOS and the Free University of Brussels.

The nearby Silvretta glacier lost about 1 meter (3.3 feet) more than at the same time in 1947 – the worst year in its database dating back to 1915.

HIMALAYAN THAW

Glaciers in the Himalayas are also on track for a record year of ice loss, scientists told Reuters. When the summer monsoon season arrived in the Kashmir region, for example, many glaciers had already shrunk considerably, their snow lines starting at the top of the mountain, after a March to May heat wave marked by temperatures above 48 °C (118 °F) in northern India.

Read also | Himalayan glaciers are melting at ‘exceptional rate’ due to global warming: study

An expedition in early June to Himachal Pradesh in India discovered that Chhota Shigri Glacier had lost much of its snow cover. “The highest temperature in over a century from March to May has clearly had its effects,” said glaciologist Mohd Farooq Azam from the Indian Institute of Technology Indore.

LOSING “NATIONAL HERITAGE”

Vanishing glaciers are already endangering lives and livelihoods. Earlier this month, a glacier collapse on Italy’s Marmolada killed 11 people. A few days later, a collapsing glacier in the Tian Shan Mountains in eastern Kyrgyzstan triggered a massive avalanche, sending ice and rocks flying towards passing tourists.

Above the Swiss village of Saas Fee, a path leading to a mountain hut once crossed a field of summer snow on top of the Chessjen glacier.

“It’s too dangerous now,” due to the risk of falling rocks, once held together by frozen ice, goalkeeper Dario Andenmatten said as he gazed out over a barren landscape dotted with glacial lakes. Nearby, we could hear the roar of stones falling from the mountain.

Swiss residents fear that glacial losses will hurt their economy. Some ski resorts in the Alps region, which depend on these glaciers, now cover them with white sheets to reflect sunlight and reduce melting.

Swiss glaciers feature in many of the country’s fairy tales and the Aletsch Glacier is considered a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Losing the glaciers “is losing our national heritage, our identity,” said hiker Bernardin Chavaillaz. “It’s sad.”

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IOWA DNR Outdoor Report Week of July 26 – KCHA News https://denversnow.co/iowa-dnr-outdoor-report-week-of-july-26-kcha-news/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 18:11:15 +0000 https://denversnow.co/iowa-dnr-outdoor-report-week-of-july-26-kcha-news/ Iowa pheasant hunters had a great season last year, harvesting the most roosters since 2008, and many are looking forward to what 2022 has in store for them. This fall forecast will be based on the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) annual roadside pheasant count, which begins August 1. The statewide survey is being […]]]>

Iowa pheasant hunters had a great season last year, harvesting the most roosters since 2008, and many are looking forward to what 2022 has in store for them. This fall forecast will be based on the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) annual roadside pheasant count, which begins August 1.

The statewide survey is being conducted by Iowa DNR personnel between Aug. 1 and Aug. 15, who travel 218, 30-mile routes on gravel roads at dawn in the mornings with a strong dew. Hen pheasants will move their broods to the side of the gravel road to dry off before they start feeding, making them easier to count.

Anecdotally, upland wildlife research biologist Todd Bogenschutz has received reports from southern and southwestern Iowa of quail hissing and cock pheasant crowing.

“Last year, south-central Iowa averaged six pheasants per course, so I’d be surprised if the number this year wasn’t higher. The question is whether counts in counties in the northern third of the state can increase, where we’ve had good numbers and good hunting,” Bogenschutz said. “It will be interesting to see the results of the investigation. We are dry over much of the state and survey conditions are important as the accuracy of counts depends on dew conditions when the routes are traveled.

In June, the DNR released its annual forecast for road counts, which uses a weather model based on snowfall, precipitation and temperatures from the past winter and spring. The model provides a better estimate of what the counts might look like, and it predicts counts ranging from good to better than last year. And that’s good news for hunters as they culled around 375,000 roosters in 2021.

But the best indicator for the fall season is the August Roadside Survey which counts the actual pheasants seen along more than 6,000 miles of rural gravel roads.

“I’m cautiously optimistic for this fall,” he said. “All indicators are pointing in the right direction.”

The August road survey has been carried out on the same roads since 1962. In addition to pheasants and quails, the survey collects data on partridges, rabbits and hares. Results will be posted online at www.iowadnr.gov/pheasantsurvey in early September. Iowa pheasant season begins October 29.

The Iowa Legislature appropriated state infrastructure funds to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to be used for a community tree-planting program for derecho reclamation.

A total of $250,000 in matching funds will be made available to state and local governments, schools and volunteer organizations, and service organizations in the 27 Iowa counties included in the governor’s disaster proclamation. of Derecho of 2020 for planting trees.

Additionally, through the USDA Forest Service & National Association of State Foresters (NASF) Urban Forest Resilience Grant Program 2022, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received funding from reforestation for the emerald ash borer (EAB). A total of $250,000 in matching funds will be made available to the same 27 counties that also suffered losses from EAB.

The Community Forestry Grant Program offers repayable grants of $500 to $5,000 to be used to purchase and plant Iowa-friendly trees on public lands. Eligible public planting lands include, but are not limited to, street rights-of-way, parks, school grounds, courthouse lawns, public buildings, fairgrounds, cemeteries, libraries and the trails. Recipients will be reimbursed up to $5,000 in derecho recovery grant funds and $5,000 in matching funds.

The application and rules are available online at www.iowadnr.gov/urbanforestry. Entities may submit multiple proposals. Applications are due by September 1.

Tripoli, Iowa – Waterfowl hunters scanning shallow lakes and marshes before the season should be aware that Lake Martens in the Sweet Marsh Wildlife Area is repairing a levee and digging a channel and will not be open traffic of hunting boats. to fall.

Construction will not impact boat traffic on the rest of the marsh.

“We began dewatering the lake in May and expect the construction phase to begin, weather permitting, by late summer or early fall, with the aim of be completed in March 2023,” said Jason Auel, a wildlife biologist with the Iowa Department of Natural Sciences. Resources. “Martens Lake attracts duck hunters from across the state and we want them to know the lake won’t be an option this fall so they can make other plans.”

The project will repair more than two miles of the 70-year-old levee system, improve three miles of canals in the marshes used for boating access, remove sediment to create deep water areas and repair the structure water control.

“Repairing the levee system will allow us to manage the water level of Lake Martens to benefit fish and wildlife, and improve public access,” Auel said.

Hunting on other segments of Sweet Marsh will still be available for the duration of the project. The contractor will operate from the main parking lot, which may be closed to public access for the duration of the project.

For more information, call the Cedar-Wapsi Wildlife Unit at 319-882-4252.

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United States and Canada Snow Blowers Market Report 2022-2027 featuring top vendors https://denversnow.co/united-states-and-canada-snow-blowers-market-report-2022-2027-featuring-top-vendors/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 08:18:00 +0000 https://denversnow.co/united-states-and-canada-snow-blowers-market-report-2022-2027-featuring-top-vendors/ company logo Dublin, 19 July. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The report “Snow Blower Market in the United States and Canada – Industry Outlook and Forecast 2022-2027” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The snow blower market in the United States and Canada is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.74% during the forecast […]]]>

company logo

Dublin, 19 July. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The report “Snow Blower Market in the United States and Canada – Industry Outlook and Forecast 2022-2027” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The snow blower market in the United States and Canada is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.74% during the forecast period.

The report examines the current scenario of the Snow Blower market in the United States and Canada and its market dynamics for 2022-2027. It covers a detailed overview of several growth drivers, restraints and trends. The study covers both industry demand and supply. It also profiles and analyzes leading companies and several other leading companies operating in the industry.

KEY POINTS

Consumer awareness of DIY concepts has positively influenced the residential snow thrower market. Growing popularity among home users to clean driveways, backyards, and porches coupled with the penetration of robotic lawn mowers in residential and commercial applications is driving the demand for the snow blower market.

The development and production of high-capacity robotic snowblowers are notable drivers of market growth. Additionally, growing environmental concerns regarding global warming and harmful fuel or exhaust emissions are the major factors that are likely to support the growth of the battery-operated snow blower market.

Due to the lockdown, all roads and airports have been closed, which has significantly impacted the demand for snow blowers in the commercial sector. However, this decline was offset by increased demand from the residential sector. The increasing use of durable products by commercial and residential consumers is increasing the popularity of snow throwers. Features such as compactness and low maintenance play a vital role when selecting the type of snowblower.

Modern self-contained snow blower technology has increased the demand for snow blowers. Its compact size and durability have gained popularity with homeowners. The snow blower has been available for a long time to maintain a competitive position in the market.

SEGMENT ANALYSIS

The requirements of the single-stage blower are increasing due to its compact size and efficient snow removal power. Two-stage snowblowers hold the majority of the market share over the forecast period. The seller also emphasizes the machine with less emissions to minimize the pollution effect.

Gas-powered snow thrower dominates the industry share of snow throwers based on fuel type due to their effective and efficient quality of clearing deep and heavy snowfall. Gasoline snow thrower comes in different models and sizes with different features like self-propel which makes it more convenient.

However, electric snowblowers are also expected to contribute a significant portion of the industry. Their demand is increasing due to their characteristics of lightweight and quiet nature.

COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

The snow blower markets in the United States and Canada have a high concentration, with major players such as Ariens Co., Husqvarna, STIGA, and The Toro Company accounting for a significant portion of the industry.

Main suppliers

  • Husqvarna Group

  • Rams

  • MTD Products Inc.

  • The Toro Company

Other Important Suppliers

Main topics covered:

1 Research methodology

2 research objectives

3 Research process

4 Scope and coverage
4.1 Market definition
4.2 Base year
4.3 Scope of the study

5 Report assumptions and caveats
5.1 Main caveats
5.2 Currency conversion
5.3 Market Derivation

6 The market at a glance

7 Presentation
7.1 Overview
7.2 Impact of Covid-19

8 Market Opportunities and Trends
8.1 Increase road and highway infrastructure
8.2 Changing Snowfall Patterns
8.3 Focus on promotional strategies

9 Market Growth Catalysts
9.1 Increase in R&D and technological advancements
9.2 Increase in Demand for Durable Snow Blowers
9.3 Improved security rules

10 Market Restrictions
10.1 Impact of snowblowers on the environment
10.2 Seasonal demand

11 Market landscape
11.1 Market Overview
11.2 Market Size and Forecast
11.2.1 Value and volume
11.3 Step
11.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
11.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
11.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
11.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
11.4 Single-stage per fuel
11.5 Two stages per fuel
11.6 Three stages per fuel
11.7 Fuel
11.8 Gas powered by stage
11.9 Electric wired per scene
11.10 Step-by-step cordless electric
11.11 Product
11.12 Clearance width
11.13 End User
11.14 Broadcast
11.15 Five Forces Analysis

12 Step
12.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
12.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
12.3 Market Overview
12.4 One-step
12.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
12.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
12.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
12.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
12.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
12.5 Two Stages
12.6 Three Steps

13 Clearance width
13.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
13.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
13.3 Market Overview
13.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
13.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
13.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
13.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
13.4 >25 Inches
13.5 < 25 inches

14 Fuel
14.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
14.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
14.3 Market Overview
14.4 Gasoline
14.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
14.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.3 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.5 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.6 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.7 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.8 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.9 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.5 Electric wire
14.6 Electrical Wireless/Battery

15 Product
15.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
15.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
15.3 Market Overview
15.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
15.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
15.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
15.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
15.4 Walking behind
15.5 Ride-On
15.6 Robotics

16 End user
16.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
16.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
16.3 Market Overview
16.4 Commercial
16.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
16.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
16.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
16.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
16.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
16.5 Residential

17 Distribution
17.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
17.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
17.3 Market Overview
17.4 Online
17.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
17.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
17.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
17.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
17.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
17.5 Offline

18 key countries
18.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
18.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/3s4012

CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
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Snowblower Market Report in United States and Canada 2022-2027 https://denversnow.co/snowblower-market-report-in-united-states-and-canada-2022-2027/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://denversnow.co/snowblower-market-report-in-united-states-and-canada-2022-2027/ Dublin, 19 July. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The report “Snow Blower Market in the United States and Canada – Industry Outlook and Forecast 2022-2027” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The snow blower market in the United States and Canada is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.74% during the forecast period. The […]]]>

Dublin, 19 July. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The report “Snow Blower Market in the United States and Canada – Industry Outlook and Forecast 2022-2027” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The snow blower market in the United States and Canada is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.74% during the forecast period.

The report examines the current scenario of the Snow Blower market in the United States and Canada and its market dynamics for 2022-2027. It covers a detailed overview of several growth drivers, restraints and trends. The study covers both industry demand and supply. It also profiles and analyzes leading companies and several other leading companies operating in the industry.

KEY POINTS

Consumer awareness of DIY concepts has positively influenced the residential snow thrower market. Growing popularity among home users to clean driveways, backyards, and porches coupled with the penetration of robotic lawn mowers in residential and commercial applications is driving the demand for the snow blower market.

The development and production of high-capacity robotic snowblowers are notable drivers of market growth. Additionally, growing environmental concerns regarding global warming and harmful fuel or exhaust emissions are the major factors that are likely to support the growth of the battery-operated snow blower market.

Due to the lockdown, all roads and airports have been closed, which has significantly impacted the demand for snow blowers in the commercial sector. However, this decline was offset by increased demand from the residential sector. The increasing use of durable products by commercial and residential consumers is increasing the popularity of snow throwers. Features such as compactness and low maintenance play a vital role when selecting the type of snowblower.

Modern self-contained snow blower technology has increased the demand for snow blowers. Its compact size and durability have gained popularity with homeowners. The snow blower has been available for a long time to maintain a competitive position in the market.

SEGMENT ANALYSIS

The requirements of the single-stage blower are increasing due to its compact size and efficient snow removal power. Two-stage snowblowers hold the majority of the market share over the forecast period. The seller also emphasizes the machine with less emissions to minimize the pollution effect.

Gas-powered snow thrower dominates the industry share of snow throwers based on fuel type due to their effective and efficient quality of clearing deep and heavy snowfall. Gasoline snow thrower comes in different models and sizes with different features like self-propel which makes it more convenient.

However, electric snowblowers are also expected to contribute a significant portion of the industry. Their demand is increasing due to their characteristics of lightweight and quiet nature.

COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

The snow blower markets in the United States and Canada have a high concentration, with major players such as Ariens Co., Husqvarna, STIGA, and The Toro Company accounting for a significant portion of the industry.

Main suppliers

  • Husqvarna Group
  • Rams
  • MTD Products Inc.
  • The Toro Company

Other Important Suppliers

  • Briggs & Stratton
  • GreenWorks
  • snow joe
  • STIGA
  • Alamo Group
  • ego power
  • Honda Power
  • John Deere
  • Vicon
  • Smart Power
  • Magnifying glass
  • Techtronic Industries Limited
  • Lowe’s Corporation

Main topics covered:

1 Research methodology

2 research objectives

3 Research process

4 Scope and coverage
4.1 Market definition
4.2 Reference year
4.3 Scope of the study

5 Report assumptions and caveats
5.1 Main caveats
5.2 Currency conversion
5.3 Market Derivation

6 The market at a glance

7 Presentation
7.1 Overview
7.2 Impact of Covid-19

8 Market Opportunities and Trends
8.1 Increase road and highway infrastructure
8.2 Changing Snowfall Patterns
8.3 Focus on promotional strategies

9 Market Growth Catalysts
9.1 Increase in R&D and technological advancements
9.2 Increase in Demand for Durable Snow Blowers
9.3 Improved security rules

10 Market Restrictions
10.1 Impact of snowblowers on the environment
10.2 Seasonal demand

11 Market landscape
11.1 Market Overview
11.2 Market Size and Forecast
11.2.1 Value and volume
11.3 Step
11.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
11.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
11.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
11.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
11.4 Single-stage per fuel
11.5 Two stages per fuel
11.6 Three stages per fuel
11.7 Fuel
11.8 Gas powered by stage
11.9 Electric wired per scene
11.10 Step-by-step cordless electric
11.11 Product
11.12 Clearance width
11.13 End User
11.14 Broadcast
11.15 Five Forces Analysis

12 Step
12.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
12.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
12.3 Market Overview
12.4 One-step
12.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
12.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
12.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
12.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
12.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
12.5 Two Stages
12.6 Three Steps

13 Clearance width
13.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
13.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
13.3 Market Overview
13.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
13.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
13.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
13.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
13.4 >25 Inches
13.5 < 25 inches

14 Fuel
14.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
14.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
14.3 Market Overview
14.4 Gasoline
14.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
14.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.3 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.5 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.6 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.7 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
14.4.8 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.4.9 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
14.5 Electric wire
14.6 Electrical Wireless/Battery

15 Product
15.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
15.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
15.3 Market Overview
15.3.1 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
15.3.2 Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
15.3.3 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
15.3.4 Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
15.4 Walking behind
15.5 Ride-On
15.6 Robotics

16 End user
16.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
16.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
16.3 Market Overview
16.4 Commercial
16.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
16.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
16.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
16.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
16.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
16.5 Residential

17 Distribution
17.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
17.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment
17.3 Market Overview
17.4 Online
17.4.1 Market Size and Forecast (Value and Volume)
17.4.2 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Revenue
17.4.3 Market by Geography – Revenue
17.4.4 Historical Market Size and Forecast – Unit Shipment
17.4.5 Market by Geography – Unit Shipment
17.5 Offline

18 key countries
18.1 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Revenue
18.2 Market Overview and Growth Driver – Unit Shipment

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/3s4012

        
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Dealing with the AJK floods | Special report https://denversnow.co/dealing-with-the-ajk-floods-special-report/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 23:46:18 +0000 https://denversnow.co/dealing-with-the-ajk-floods-special-report/ Photo courtesy: Amirudin Mughal fter several weeks of intense heat and extreme humidity, the first monsoon rains hit Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) on 1 July. Fortunately, the loss of life and material damage were limited. However, according to the Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD), more than 16,000 families in the state are vulnerable to disruption […]]]>
Photo courtesy: Amirudin Mughal

fter several weeks of intense heat and extreme humidity, the first monsoon rains hit Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) on 1 July. Fortunately, the loss of life and material damage were limited. However, according to the Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD), more than 16,000 families in the state are vulnerable to disruption from the floods.

Light to heavy showers were reported in Rawalakot, Muzaffarabad and some other towns. Rawalakot and surrounding areas received light rains but Muzaffarabad received heavy rains which flooded lower areas of the city. The situation has forced the authorities to issue a notice to tourists to limit their movements.

According to the National Disaster Management Authority (SDMA), Azad Jammu and Kashmir could receive 49 percent more rain this year than the previous record. Rain-related accidents in the AJK have so far claimed four lives. Eight people were injured. Fifty-four houses were destroyed by rain or flooding and two were partially damaged. The floods also destroyed five stores. Neelum Valley received unexpected snowfall, killing 741 cattle.

Prime Minister Sardar Tanveer Ilyas Khan has ordered relevant authorities and departments, including the SDMA, to remain on high alert to deal with any emergency.

Saeed Qureshi, the director of the SDMA, said authorities were anticipating flash floods, landslides, road blockages and cloud bursts in various areas. “AJK has been mostly safe so far. However, a lot of rain is still to come. SDMA has prepared a monsoon contingency plan to deal with the situation. It has mapped resources and keeps all stakeholders on board.

Officials say relevant authorities have identified vulnerable areas where flooding could hit. Arrangements have been made to ensure security. Plans have been drawn up for effective management of camps and food in areas where an evacuation may occur. Alternate locations have also been identified for disaster-affected people. The Monsoon Contingency Plan is reviewed regularly in coordination with the Departments of Land Use Planning and Housing (PPH) and Communication and Works (C&W).

The SDMA has appointed focal points in all districts of the AJK. They are responsible for providing updates on precipitation intensity across the AJK. Information is collected regularly and plans aligned based on the current situation.

Officials say Sunday news that the government has provided the affected people so far with 56 tents, 16 plastic mats, 88 plastic sheeting, 11 mattresses, 35 medicine kits, 35 food parcels, 18 shawls, nine sleeping bags, nine cooking utensils and nine cans of water.

Masood Ur Rehman, the Muzaffarabad division commissioner, says much of the AJK is hilly areas with fast-flowing waterways that can become a source of disasters during monsoons. Continuous rains can trigger landslides and local and regional flooding. He says people falling into fast-flowing waters are the most common cause of death during the monsoon season. Lightning strikes also cause death and destruction.

He says that the AJK administration has previously carried out a disaster risk assessment and is ready to respond to any situation.

The AJK Board of Revenue (AJK-BOR) provides financial assistance to people affected by natural disasters. The SDMA is responsible for early response down to the district level. It operates through District Disaster Management Authorities (DDMAs), headed by Deputy Commissioners (DCs) in each district.

In an emergency, DDMAs can mobilize special equipment and call 1122 for assistance. Disaster damage data is recorded and reported daily. The DDMAs aggregate all government/non-government machinery and manpower available in the region to handle disaster situations. Monsoon contingency plans are prepared in May each year. The exercise is supervised by the competent marshals. Food and non-food relief items are made available to the DDMAs. All stores and warehouses are operational during monsoon periods.

The AJK government established the SDMA in 2006 to deal with disaster situations. However, he struggled to acquire specialized skills and adequate resources to deal with the challenges. So far, it also lacks presence on social media platforms and websites. This makes it harder for citizens who need help to find useful and up-to-date information. Given the threats of climate change, more financial resources, equipment, and political guidance are needed for the SDMA to be better able to help people during disasters.


The author is a freelance contributor based in Rawalakot, AJK. She tweets @hunain_mahmood and can be reached at hunainmehmud101@gmail.com

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Report details local climate chaos and solutions https://denversnow.co/report-details-local-climate-chaos-and-solutions/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 05:30:00 +0000 https://denversnow.co/report-details-local-climate-chaos-and-solutions/ Juneau receives 20 inches more rain per year than it did a century ago, snowfall could drop nearly 60% by the end of this century, and the Mendenhall Glacier will likely disappear from sight at the visitor center in Juneau. 2050, according to a new report specific to Juneau. climate report released on Monday. The […]]]>

Juneau receives 20 inches more rain per year than it did a century ago, snowfall could drop nearly 60% by the end of this century, and the Mendenhall Glacier will likely disappear from sight at the visitor center in Juneau. 2050, according to a new report specific to Juneau. climate report released on Monday.

The changes also pose significant threats to local food sources, such as salmon and crab species, whales, and tour operators taking advantage of viewing cruises and infrastructure running from a large percentage of downtown buildings. from Juneau to the Mendenhall sewage treatment plant.

However, the report released by the Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center at the University of Alaska Southeast goes beyond simply listing all the past and future changes and their mostly negative impacts, detailing the remedies already tempted and potentially mitigating future actions.

“Long before Western observations of climate change, indigenous peoples of Southeast Alaska observed and responded adaptively to changes in this dynamic environment, including rapid glacial advances and retreats, uplift and falling sea levels and a host of extreme events well documented in oral histories,” wrote Thomas Thorton, one of the study’s 22 co-authors, in an introductory post.

“Now, a new era of climate change unprecedented in human history is upon us, and Juneau, as a modern capital and regional hub, must respond and adapt accordingly. The citizens of Juneau launched an innovative carbon offset program, its scientists conduct impactful research on forests, temperate forests and glaciers, and its downtown port holds the world’s first shore power outlet for cruise ships to reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

A webinar on the study hosted by some of its authors is scheduled for Thursday at 9 a.m.

For skeptics who argue that climate change has historically occurred over time periods measured in decades or millennia, the new Juneau-focused report agrees that’s true — from a certain perspective.

For example, the increase in average annual precipitation from about 160 inches in 1920 to 180 inches in 2020 did not occur in a straight line.

“The mid-1930s to mid-1940s were wet, then the 1950s to 1970s were relatively dry, and since the mid-1990s wetter conditions have returned,” the study notes. “And within those ten or two intervals, there are individual years that are exceptionally wet or dry.”

However, the main conclusion, as with most modern climate change impacts, is that historic amounts of global change are likely to continue and often at increasing rates in the future.

“This year-to-year and decade-to-decade variability will continue into the future even if the long-term rainfall trend continues to increase,” the study notes.

The changes will be harmful to local animal life, studies say, ranging from tiny seabed organisms endangered by increasingly acidic waters to mountain goats who may only find mountain tops cool enough to survive. exist during the warmer months.

Damage to humans will range from Alaskan Natives increasingly unable to survive on traditional food sources, to potential loss of homes due to landslides and floods, to all-out struggles involving everything from transportation to mental health.

Similarly, while the overall annual temperature increase of about 1 degree Fahrenheit since 1925 is not huge, the changes are significant during the winter and summer months.

“Taken together, retreating glaciers, increased flooding, and greater avalanche threat are all related to these larger-scale changes in the environment,” the study notes. “Other observed changes that have cascading effects, such as the duration of snow cover at low elevations, are directly attributable to seasonal changes in temperature and total precipitation. These changes will continue in the future, perhaps on a much larger scale.

There are also quirks that run counter to global trends, such as sea level rise, which has some major coastal cities worried about seeing significant portions possibly submerged. But Juneau is experiencing a relative sea level drop that has been occurring for centuries due to the region’s land surface uplift rates.

This finding gets stranger looking to the future, predicting that sea levels could drop 2.9 feet or rise as much as 4.3 feet by 2100 depending on the amount of global gas emissions. Greenhouse effect.

The report details nine key findings, including seven impacts and two related to responses:

More precipitation: Juneau is on a long-term rising trend, with average annual precipitation increasing by about 20 inches over the past 96 years

Rising temperature: A general overall increase is marked by significant increases in winter and summer, but much less in spring and fall.

Less snow: The average winter accumulation in Juneau has decreased between 1940 and 2020, and continued warming is expected to reduce snowfall near sea level.

Surface uplift and sea level rise: Sea level rise is currently exceeded by land surface uplift caused by retreating glaciers, but sea level rise could exceed land surface uplift later this century.

Ocean warming: Warming sea temperatures are expected to significantly stress many parts of ocean ecosystems – such as marine mammals, fish and seabirds – and could promote algal blooms.

Increased ocean acidification: The decline in marine pH is likely to cause widespread negative social and ecological impacts on marine ecosystems.

More landslides: Landslides are expected to increase as the climate becomes warmer, wetter, and characterized by more extreme precipitation events.

Answer – reduction of greenhouse gases: The City and Borough of Juneau have developed a climate policy and proposed to implement strategic climate actions to reduce greenhouse gases by obtaining 80% of Juneau’s energy from renewable sources by 2045 .

Response – residents take action: Juneau nonprofit organizations and tribal and local governments are taking action to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

“The fact that traditional wild food sources are now being classified so that Indigenous peoples can better manage harvests within the limits imposed by climate change is a testament to the resilience of the Tlingit and Haida peoples,” notes the report on the second element of response. . “Faced with the bitter reality of change, the authors of the Climate Adaptation Plan have chosen to confront the situation head on and find ways to adapt. The wider community can learn from this, as everyone in the CBJ can expect to have to adapt to changes in their food supply brought on by climate-related factors.

Contact journalist Mark Sabbatini at mark.sabbatini@juneauempire.com.


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Extreme drought conditions persist in California: report https://denversnow.co/extreme-drought-conditions-persist-in-california-report/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 13:54:28 +0000 https://denversnow.co/extreme-drought-conditions-persist-in-california-report/ Nevada [US], July 3 (ANI/Xinhua): The latest data released by the US Drought Monitor (USDM) showed that California remained mired in extreme drought conditions as the most populous state in the United States entered its tenth month of the hydrological year 2022. In total, 97.5% of the state’s area is at least in a “severe” […]]]>

Nevada [US], July 3 (ANI/Xinhua): The latest data released by the US Drought Monitor (USDM) showed that California remained mired in extreme drought conditions as the most populous state in the United States entered its tenth month of the hydrological year 2022. In total, 97.5% of the state’s area is at least in a “severe” drought condition, 59.8% in at least an “extreme” drought condition, and the 11 driest .6% in “exceptional” drought condition, according to USDM’s weekly report update. released Thursday.

These figures have disappointed scientists and local residents who were optimistic that record weather conditions from last October, when the water season started, to last December would help avert a third straight year of drought. A series of October storms, including a monstrous “bomb cyclone” system, brought the wettest day on record to northern California, and winter storms drove the central Sierra Nevada range to break an absolute record for snowfall in December.

However, abysmal rain and snow totals from January through March, combined with bouts of extreme heat in late spring and early summer, evaporated much of the relief from the fall drought and of last winter. From January to March 2022, California received only about half the amount of precipitation recorded compared to 2013, which ended up being the driest calendar year on record, media reported.

Additionally, the snowpack melted to zero in the southern Sierra on May 24 and in the central Sierra on June 3, and both were much earlier than usual, according to the California Department of Water Resources. With snowpack, California’s main source of water, at its lowest level in seven years, most of the state’s major reservoirs and large lakes were below their historic average levels at the end of June.

“For sure every lake I’ve been to is sinking,” Chris Jones, a Reno City-based data analyst and fishing enthusiast, told Xinhua on Friday, noting that he was fishing in northern California for probably about 12 years and understood the changing climate. Jones found that Pyramid Lake, located near the California-Nevada border, had a better situation than other nearby lakes, even though the lake’s water level had also dropped about 4 feet (about 1 .2 m) in about two years.

“We haven’t had any rain here lately, we just haven’t had much snow here…the rivers have been very low for the past few years and other lakes have been quite low,” he said. -he declares. Data released Friday by the California Department of Water Resources confirmed Jones’s remarks, showing that 11 of the state’s 12 major reservoirs are below their historical average.

Although California’s drinking water largely depends on groundwater and the Colorado River, its reservoir system is vital to the state’s massive agricultural industry. According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the state produces more than one-third of the nation’s vegetables and two-thirds of America’s fruits and nuts.

The “extreme drought”, according to the USDM, means that livestock need expensive supplementary feed, cattle and horses are sold, there is little pasture left, fruit trees are budding early and producers are starting to irrigate in winter. Additionally, the fire season will last year-round and fires can occur in generally wet parts of the state, and burning bans are being implemented under these circumstances.

“Water is insufficient for agriculture, wildlife and urban needs; the reservoirs are extremely low; hydropower is limited,” USDM charted for the Golden State in the latest report. (ANI/Xinhua)

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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NH gets hotter, wetter https://denversnow.co/nh-gets-hotter-wetter/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 16:52:30 +0000 https://denversnow.co/nh-gets-hotter-wetter/ Heavy rain. Less snow. Up to 60 days of oppressive heat, each year by the end of the century. New Hampshire’s 2021 climate assessment, released Wednesday, paints a grim picture of the state’s future unless greenhouse gas emissions are reduced. The report, which was funded by the state Department of Environmental Services and conducted by […]]]>

Heavy rain. Less snow. Up to 60 days of oppressive heat, each year by the end of the century.

New Hampshire’s 2021 climate assessment, released Wednesday, paints a grim picture of the state’s future unless greenhouse gas emissions are reduced.

The report, which was funded by the state Department of Environmental Services and conducted by researchers at the University of New Hampshire, shows that climate change has made the state hotter and wetter. And the future heat and precipitation projected in the study could have major implications for human health, statewide infrastructure and ecological systems, the researchers said.

The study echoes findings from the state’s latest climate assessment, released in 2014, said New Hampshire state climatologist Mary Stampone.

“What we now have a better idea of ​​is the influence of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases on exactly how much warming, wetness and extreme extremes we’re going to get,” he said. she stated.

How New Hampshire Changed

Since 1901, temperatures across the state have risen an average of 3 degrees Fahrenheit, with fall and winter warming the fastest, the report said. Extreme cold temperatures occurred less frequently and thaws occurred more often. Over the past 50 years, the state has warmed up faster.

Heavy rainfall is more frequent. Annual precipitation has increased by 12% over the past 12 decades.

Since 1971, the amount of water stored in New Hampshire’s snowpack has decreased by 59% to 91% in the central part of the state.

These trends are expected to continue in the future, Stampone said.

“But how bad the situation is still depends on us, and how much we want or are able to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions,” she said.

What the future holds

The researchers used two different scenarios to project the changes New Hampshire could see under different climate scenarios: a higher emissions scenario, where the world continues to rely on fossil fuels and global temperatures rise by 4.3 degrees Celsius , and a lower emissions scenario, where the world begins transitioning to cleaner energy and global temperatures rise by 2.4 degrees Celsius.

Although both of these scenarios are above the 1.5 degree Celsius limit targeted by the Paris Agreement, the models used by the researchers had more simulations for these two scenarios, and the team believed they would be representative of the trajectory of the coming decades.

“We think that kind of brackets the reality of where we’re going to be in the future,” said Cameron Wake, a UNH climatologist and another author of the study.

Under the higher emissions scenario, New Hampshire could see 50 to 60 days above 90 degrees each year by the end of the century. That’s halved, in a lower emissions scenario.

In the lower emissions pathway explored in the assessment, there could be up to 35 more days without snow on the ground in New Hampshire. Snowfall in the state is expected to decline 20% to 50% by 2099. The coldest day and night of the year could warm by 12 degrees in a lower emissions scenario – which is climbing at 22 degrees with more greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

In both pathways, the researchers expect an increase in extreme precipitation, as well as total annual precipitation. But as summers get warmer, that extra precipitation likely won’t make up for water evaporation, which could lead to more near-term droughts, Stampone said.

Similar trends, more data

The 2021 assessment uses data up to 2020, while the 2014 assessment included data up to 2012. This updated analysis of future climate change is based on 29 climate model simulations, instead of the four used in the previous report.

This gives more confidence in the projections, said Cameron Wake. But, he said, researchers have long known about the dangers of climate change.

The report also looked at new signs of climate change, including so-called “cooling degree days”, or measurements of a day’s temperature above 65 degrees – a comfortable temperature for humans. Some energy companies use this measurement to determine how much energy is needed to cool homes or other spaces, Stampone said.

Researchers found a 74% increase in the amount of energy needed for cooling in New Hampshire since 1971.

“I admit it takes a lot to shock me,” Stampone said. “I knew it was going to go up, but the extent to which it went up was a lot.”

Going forward, under the higher greenhouse gas concentration scenario, New Hampshire would see the energy needed for cooling double, compared to a scenario where we reduced emissions.

Researchers are still looking to assess New Hampshire’s vulnerability to drought and wildfires, as well as how the shrinking snowpack might impact water in the state’s lakes.

Impacts on granite staters

Wake said the changes described in the assessment — more rain, less snow, warmer winters, more days of extreme heat — could have far-reaching implications for Granite Staters.

“There are big questions about infrastructure. There are big questions about … the jobs and businesses that are here, and very big questions about human health and big questions about ecosystems and outdoor recreation,” he said.

Wake hopes policymakers will pay attention to the new assessment.

“You can interpret decision makers as everyone who lives in the state of New Hampshire and has to make decisions about their future, what energy they use, where they’re going to spend their money, but where they’re going to recreate” , he said.

For decision makers responsible for other people, like those in government or business, Wake said he hopes they will do two things.

“One is to develop a climate action plan that outlines how they can reduce their greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. “And then also start preparing for the inevitable changes that are coming.”

New Hampshire’s last climate action plan dates back to 2009, and lawmakers failed to advance legislation that would create a new plan during the last session.

These articles are shared by partners of The Granite State News Collaborative. For more information, visit collaborativenh.org.

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